HERMES

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  • 12godstour_hermes01
  • 12godstour_hermes02
  • 12godstour_hermes03
  • 12godstour_hermes04
  • 12godstour_hermes05
  • 12godstour_hermes06
  • 12godstour_hermes07
  • 12godstour_hermes01
  • 12godstour_hermes02
  • 12godstour_hermes03
  • 12godstour_hermes04
  • 12godstour_hermes05
  • 12godstour_hermes06
  • 12godstour_hermes07

HERMES

Bed2 Double Beds
Max People4
Window Mosquito NetYes
WiFiYes
TVYes
A/C Yes
FridgeYes
Electric Hot PlateYes
WC with ShowerYes
BalconyYes
ViewMountain
ParkingYes
Floor2nd

Hermes is an Olympian god in Greek religion and mythology, the son of Zeus and the Pleiad Maia, and the second youngest of the Olympian gods (Dionysus being the youngest).

Hermes was the emissary and messenger of the gods. Hermes was also “the divine trickster” and “the god of boundaries and the transgression of boundaries, … the patron of herdsmen, thieves, graves, and heralds.” He is described as moving freely between the worlds of the mortal and divine, and was the conductor of souls into the afterlife. He was also viewed as the protector and patron of roads and travelers.

In some myths, he is a trickster and outwits other gods for his own satisfaction or for the sake of humankind. His attributes and symbols include the herma, the rooster, the tortoise, satchel or pouch, winged sandals, and winged cap. His main symbol is the Greek kerykeion or Latin caduceus, which appears in a form of two snakes wrapped around a winged staff with carvings of the other gods.

In the Roman adaptation of the Greek pantheon (see interpretatio romana), Hermes is identified with the Roman god Mercury, who, though inherited from the Etruscans, developed many similar characteristics such as being the patron of commerce.